Book Review: 100+ Questions Kids Have About Having A Baby

When did you know it was time to hit the books with your kids? The SEX ED BOOKS???

We are fairly open and honest with our kids and have adopted an “Ask and you shall receive” policy with all of them.

They’ve actually watched their own birth videos, so we are totally down with all modes of birth. That’s all been cleared up.

Recently, one of my sons asked me: “Mum, how are babies made? I know how they get out, but how do they get in there?” (There being a pregnant woman’s uterus).

Then the other son said “I think the mother eats the baby. Actually, no. I think God puts all the body parts in there and then it comes together like a Mr Potato Head”.

This is not how a baby is made.

Snort! I mean, responsible adult parent hat on.

“I think it’s time to have a look in the baby book!”, I said, with a little more enthusiasm than intended.

I had a copy of Interrelate’s book, 100+ Questions Kids Have About Having A Baby on hand from a recent review I did of it over on my blog. I whipped it off the bookshelf with glee and sat my boys on my bed to read.

Interrelate is an awesome organisation that delivers education to school children in New South Wales, (Australia), and has been operating since 1926. Interrelate has developed a series of books to assist families in educating their children in the home.

Interrelate’s books feature excellent, engaging visual design. Brightly-coloured pages and fun, animated images, and are perfect for kids aged between eight and twelve.

The cover of the book features the illustration style and layout.

I really like the book’s layout. It isn’t a book I’d read cover-to-cover (although, you certainly could, if you chose to), but more a resource I could turn to as a particular question (or five) arose. Because my older kids are eight, and six, they have different levels of understanding, and therefore different questions.

The book uses real questions written by children during Interrelate lessons. They appear on each page as a starting point for the explanation or answer to the question. As a teacher myself, I did notice straight away the spelling and grammatical mistakes in these hand-written notes from the kids.  (The reasoning for leaving the kids’ questions as written is explained in the book).

Next, I noticed on the contents page that there’s just one image: a baby holding a bottle of milk. Out of curiosity I flicked through the book searching for an image of a baby breastfeeding (I was really hoping for a picture of a baby and a boob), and bingo! There it was – on page 29. Now, in fairness, the book is organised chronologically, from conception to birth, to infancy, but I would have really loved to see that boobing babe up the front with the little bottle fed bubba.

In all, I really enjoyed reading this book myself, and have already shown my younger children (the five- and three- year-old) some sections I think they’d be interested in. I feel it’s a fantastic starting point for conversations, and it’s worded in an appropriate and factual manner.

I found some of the questions posed by students very insightful and honest. They are real questions that kids have, and I think this brings an extra element of relevance. Being written by real kids brings an authenticity to the book.

100+ Questions About Having a Baby is a valuable resource our family will consult for years to come.

This is one of five books in this series by Interrelate. The other titles include:

  • 500+ Questions Kids Have About Sexuality
  • 100+ Questions Kids Have About Bullying
  • 400+ Questions Kids Have About Relationships
  • 100+ Questions Kids Have About Puberty

All of these titles are available to purchase directly from the Interrelate website here.

Bronwyn Brady

I'm a mummy of four with a vivid imagination, an obsession with Duplo, and an uncanny ability to assemble flat-pack furniture. I'm also a teacher with a passion for play-based learning and an interest in the Reggio Emilia approach. I love taking Devonshire tea, looking through heritage-listed homes and collecting Royal Albert china. But I also love jumping in muddy puddles, eating jellybeans and riding rollercoasters.

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